Contact email: f-back@resurv.co.uk

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WHY use NATnIMP?

  • identify need,
  • routinely explore the suicide prevention needs of all young people accessing the service,
  • improve services,
  • prove success of interventions,
  • show how well services meet LGBT young people's needs,
  • influence local strategies,
  • influence mainstream and specialist service provision,
  • help access funding, and
  • help gather evidence to influence national strategy.

 

LGBT young people vulnerable

There is now significant international and national research which identifies lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) young people as a highly vulnerable group.

It is our duty as professionals to try and reduce this vulnerability.  The NATnIMP have been developed precisely for this reason: it enables you to work alongside LGBT young people to help them understand whether and how they are vulnerable, why they are vulnerable and to have some control over what to do about it.

NATnIMP available online

The NAT takes an holistic approach, and provides insights into coming out, school, hate incidents, homelessness, mental health, alcohol, drugs and smoking, sexual health, isolation and support, and more.  It uses a number of standard validated tools such as AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders and Identification Test) and the RSE (Rosenberg Self Esteem questionnaire).

The NAT also asks about self harm, suicidal thoughts and feelings and attempted suicide as well as the perceived link between these problems and LGBT identity. It enables service providers to routinely explore the suicide prevention needs of LGBT young people accessing the service.

It is used as part of the assessment and referral process: it takes about an hour to interview a member and then, using the automatically created report, the worker and young person agree an action plan which can be regularly reviewed.  Referrals can then be made as appropriate, e.g. to the GUM clinic, for counselling, for housing support, further 1-1 support, etc.

The IMP is conducted six months later.  After completion a report is produced which allows examination of the journey the young person has travelled between the NAT and IMP and to identify and agree any further necessary actions.

The whole process enables and supports young people to take responsibility for their own development.

'Where to turn, a review of current provision in online and offline mental health support for LGBT people experiencing suicidal distress,' (2010) by the London-based LGBT mental health charity, PACE, identifies the NATnIMP as a an example of good practice (page 56). See the 'Where to turn' report here.

You can register now to start using the NAT.

The annual fee for a typical LGBT youth group is £70 and covers everything they need, including the use of NATnIMP with all their members, the individual and cumulative reports, and support. The registration fee is  £30. Other agencies with different requirements should contact us. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 0118 978 1078.

Gay and Lesbian Youth in Calderdale (GALYIC), and in particular Jan Bridget, pioneered the development and use of the NATnIMP.  GALYIC closed in 2012 but in order to ensure this important resource is still available, ReSURV, in partnership with Jan Bridget, have amended and up-dated the NATnIMP.  It is now online so that other LGBT groups and relevant agencies can benefit from these tools.

Needs Assessment Tool (NAT)
Using evidence from research conducted in 1998 and several years experience of responding to the needs of LGBT young people, GALYIC decided  there was a need for an easy-to-use but comprehensive method of assessing the needs of its members. By 2005 GALYIC had developed the NAT and began to use it.
Impact Assessment Tool (IMP)
In 2007 Calderdale PCT funded GALYIC to conduct further needs assessments with members, develop an Impact Assessment Tool (IMP) which would provide evidence of the success (or not) of the GALYIC interventions, as well as finding out what other services were doing to meet the needs of LGBT young people.
 

Local authorities, Primary Care Trusts, providers and commissioners of services, all must take account of the needs of young people in their area, including  LGBT young people.  
We need to keep up to date with the needs of LGBT young people

In 2005, the Needs Assessment Tool (NAT) was developed.  It is an holistic approach and includes questions about:
coming out, school, hate incidents, homelessness, mental health, alcohol, drugs and smoking, sexual health, isolation and support.